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Bream Gives Me Hiccups

Bream Gives Me Hiccups: And Other Stories is the whip-smart fiction debut of Academy Award-nominated actor and star of The Social Network, Jesse Eisenberg. Known for his iconic film roles but also for his regular pieces in the New Yorker and his two critically acclaimed plays, Eisenberg is an emerging voice in fiction.

Taking its title from a group of stories that begin the book, Bream Gives Me Hiccups moves from contemporary L.A. to the dormrooms of an American college to ancient Pompeii, throwing the reader into a universe of social misfits, reimagined scenes from history, and ridiculous overreactions.

United by Eisenberg’s gift for humour and character, and grouped into chapters that each open with an illustration by award-winning cartoonist Jean Jullien, the witty pieces collected in Bream Gives Me Hiccups explore what it means to navigate the modern world, and mark the arrival of a fantastically funny, self-ironic, witty and original voice.

Goodnight, Beautiful Women

Anna Noyes has produced a powerful, mesmerizing debut collection of loosely interconnected short stories. Assured and atmospheric and imbued with the luminous beauty of the Maine coastline, these stories are bold, unflinching and utterly compelling. Ordinary lives are held under the microscope, making them vivid, extraordinary – steeped with promise yet mired by threat, driven mad with longing, muted by heartache and loss, trapped in the evanescence of memory. With breathtaking control and a rhythmic, lucid prose that is distinctly her own, Goodnight Beautiful Women marks Anna Noyes as an exhilarating new talent.

Trajectory

RTE Guide‘s Book of the Year, 2018

Richard Russo’s characters in these four expansive stories bear little similarity to the blue-collar citizens we’re familiar with from many of his novels. In ‘Horseman,’ a professor confronts a young plagiarist as well as her own weaknesses as the Thanksgiving holiday looms closer and closer. In ‘Intervention,’ a real estate agent facing an ominous medical prognosis finds himself in his father’s shadow while he presses forward – or not. In ‘Voice,’ a semi-retired academic is conned by his estranged brother into joining a group tour of the Venice Biennale, fleeing a mortifying incident with a traumatised student back in Massachusetts but encountering further complications in the maze of Venice. And in ‘Milton and Marcus,’ a lapsed novelist tries to rekindle his screenwriting career, only to be stymied by the pratfalls of that trade when he’s called to an aging, iconic star’s mountaintop retreat in Wyoming.

Each of these stories is shot through with the humour, wisdom and surprise for which Richard Russo has long been acclaimed as Trajectory continues to extend the breadth of his achievements.

Afterparties

WINNER OF THE JOHN LEONARD PRIZE AT THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS AND THE FERRO-GRUMLEY AWARD FOR LGBTQ FICTION
THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

‘So’s distinctive voice is ever-present: mellifluous, streetwise and slightly brash, at once cynical and bighearted…unique and quintessential’ Sunday Times

‘So’s stories reimagine and reanimate the Central Valley, in the way that the polyglot stories in Bryan Washington’s collection Lot reimagined Houston and Ocean Vuong’s novel On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous allowed us to see Hartford in a fresh light.’ Dwight Garner, New York Times

‘[A] remarkable début collection’ Hua Hsu, The New Yorker

A Roxane Gay’s Audacious Book Club Pick!

Named a Best Book of Summer by: Wall Street Journal * Thrillist * Vogue * Lit Hub * Refinery29 * New York Observer * The Daily Beast * Time * BuzzFeed * Entertainment Weekly

Seamlessly transitioning between the absurd and the tender-hearted, balancing acerbic humour with sharp emotional depth, Afterparties offers an expansive portrait of the lives of Cambodian-Americans. As the children of refugees carve out radical new paths for themselves in California, they shoulder the inherited weight of the Khmer Rouge genocide and grapple with the complexities of race, sexuality, friendship and family.

A high school badminton coach and failing grocery store owner tries to relive his glory days by beating a rising star teenage player. Two drunken brothers attend a wedding afterparty and hatch a plan to expose their shady uncle’s snubbing of the bride and groom. A queer love affair sparks between an older tech entrepreneur trying to launch a ‘safe space’ app and a disillusioned young teacher obsessed with Moby-Dick. And in the sweeping final story, a nine-year-old child learns that his mother survived a racist school shooter.

With nuanced emotional precision, gritty humour and compassionate insight into the intimacy of queer and immigrant communities, the stories in Afterparties deliver an explosive introduction to the work of Anthony Veasna So.

Exquisite Cadavers

From the author of When I Hit You, shortlisted for the 2018 Women’s Prize for Fiction

Karim and Maya:
[x] share a home
[x] worry about money
[x] binge-watch films
[x] argue all the time

Karim, a young film-maker, carries with him the starry-eyed dreams of the Arab Revolution. Maya carries her own pressing concerns: an errant father, an unstable job, a chain-smoking habit, a sudden pregnancy. When Karim’s brother disappears in Tunis, and Karim wants to go after him, Maya must choose between her partner and her home city, her future and her history…

In a conversation between forms, fictions and truths, Exquisite Cadavers is a novel about a young couple navigating love in London, and a literary hall of mirrors about an author navigating the inspirations behind her work.

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‘An inventive fusion’ Observer
‘A work of brilliance’ Financial Times
‘Wonderful’ LitHub

The Garden of Bad Dreams

In The Garden of Bad Dreams characters strive for order despite the entropy that surrounds them: a nostalgic circus man is compelled to collect small people; an industrious monk strives to push a mountain away from his monastery; the widow of an English captain tends her rose garden wearing an old Panama hat and tiny red slippers on her bound feet; and desperate soldiers eat an entire zoo, leaving only a pale jaguar from the jungles of South America.

Transporting its readers from a city under siege to a forested hillside in central Serbia, via an ex-servicemen’s estate in Badminton, The Garden of Bad Dreams is an imaginative feast, a surprising, exhilarating meeting place for the absurd and the strangely familiar, by a writer at the height of his powers.

The Name on the Door is Not Mine

Gathered from throughout Stead’s career, these stories are a reminder of his deft storytelling and literary power. They are clever, sensual, wry and beautifully written, with Stead’s subtle sense of humour evident at every turn.

The collection can be read as a meditation on the writerly life, and includes a number of new, previously unpublished stories, including Last Season’s Man, which won the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award, as well as older stories that have been revised and rewritten. Set in locations as diverse as the South of France, Sydney, Zagreb, Auckland, San Francisco and Oxford, each story is vividly drawn.

This extraordinary collection, along with Stead’s history as New Zealand Poet Laureate (2015-17), confirms his position as an exceptionally talented writer.

Home Remedies

NAMED ONE OF THE MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS OF 2019 BY NYLON, ELECTRIC LITERATURE, THE MILLIONS AND LITHUB
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Striking, soulful and ablaze with promise.Observer
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The twelve stories in Xuan Juliana Wang’s funny and wise debut collection capture the unheard voices of a new generation of Chinese youth, a generation for whom the Cultural Revolution is a distant memory, WeChat is king and life glitters with the possibility of love, travel, technology, and, above all, new beginnings.

At the Beijing Olympics, a pair of synchronized divers stand poised at the edge of success and sexual self-discovery. A Chinese-American girl in Paris finds her life changed when she begins wearing a dead person’s clothes. And on a winter evening, a father creates an algorithm to troubleshoot the problem of raising a daughter across an ever-widening gulf of cultures and generations.

From second-generation rich kids and livestream stars to a glass-swallowing qigong grandmaster, these stories upend the well-worn path of the immigrant experience to reveal a new face of belonging: of young people testing the limits of who they are and who they will one day become, in a world as vast and various as their ambitions.

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‘Dazzling and unclassifiable…. Xuan Juliana Wang has the dark soul of an old poet’s inkwell, the deep knowing of an ancient remedy, and linguistic incandescence of a megacity skyline.’ Adam Johnson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Orphan Master’s Son

The Hall Chimp

From the Miles Franklin longlisted author of Flames, is a short story that will have you on the edge of your seat, screaming ‘wake up’.
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The mum and the dad are in bed but the boy is standing in the hallway. He’s been sleepwalking again.

The boy wakes up in the middle of the night to find a man in his hallway. But this is no regular man. No, he’s a hall chimp. The man jumps around like a chimp, scratched his armpits like a chimp, rolls around on the floor like a chimp. The boy wants to play too…

A Lesson in Englishness

There are only five other black girls in our class of twenty-six…
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From the author of the critically-acclaimed House of Stone, listed for the Folio Prize, is a short story about growing up in Zimbabwe
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A country school girl attends the prestigious Girls’ College in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and she learns how to be English. She learns pronunciations, learns to pour, sip, and hold tea, and even learns to laugh the English way– Hahaha!…Hahaha… Haaaaa haaaaa haaaa…

But things begin to change for the pupils of Girls’ College when Zimbabwe’s new president calls for ‘A’ grade schools to enrol more black pupils.