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Deception: Pakistan, The United States and the Global Nuclear Weapons Conspiracy

Deception reveals how Pakistan built a nuclear arsenal with US aid money and sold the technology to countries hostile to the West, while giving shelter to the resurgent Taliban and al-Qaeda. It also reveals the much larger deception: how every American administration from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush has actively condoned Pakistan’s nuclear activity, destroying and falsifying evidence provided by US and Western intelligence agencies, lying about Pakistan’s intentions and capability, and facilitating the spread of the very weapons we so fear terrorists will obtain. This definitive book is the essential account of our time.

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

For Rian Malan, the blessing of living in South Africa is that every day presents him with material whose richness astounds those who live in saner places. Twenty years after the publication of his bestseller My Traitor’s Heart, he is still strongly committed to the struggle against suffocating political rectitude. Malan eviscerates politicians, provokes rabid fury in Aids activists, pursues justice in the music industry, and exults in the company of an extraordinary cast of characters from truckers to tycoons.

Free Speech

Never in human history was there such a chance for freedom of expression. If we have Internet access, any one of us can publish almost anything we like and potentially reach an audience of millions. Never was there a time when the evils of unlimited speech flowed so easily across frontiers: violent intimidation, gross violations of privacy, tidal waves of abuse. A pastor burns a Koran in Florida and UN officials die in Afghanistan.

Drawing on a lifetime of writing about dictatorships and dissidents, Timothy Garton Ash argues that in this connected world that he calls cosmopolis, the way to combine freedom and diversity is to have more but also better free speech. Across all cultural divides we must strive to agree on how we disagree. He draws on a thirteen-language global online project freespeechdebate.com conducted out of Oxford University and devoted to doing just that.

With vivid examples, from his personal experience of China’s Orwellian censorship apparatus to the controversy around Charlie Hebdo to a very English court case involving food writer Nigella Lawson, he proposes a framework for civilized conflict in a world where we are all becoming neighbours.

Bean Counters

‘A devastating exposé.’ Mail on Sunday

They helped cause the 2008 financial crash.
They created a global tax avoidance industry.
They lurk behind the scenes at every level of government…

The world’s ‘Big Four’ accountancy firms – PwC, Deloitte, Ernst & Young, and KPMG – have become a gilded elite. Up in the high six figures, an average partner salary rivals that of a Premier League footballer. But how has the seemingly humdrum profession of accountancy got to this level? And what is the price we pay for their excesses?

Leading investigative journalist Richard Brooks charts the profession’s rise to global influence and offers a gripping exposé of the accountancy industry. From underpinning global tax avoidance to corrupting world football, Bean Counters reveals how the accountants have used their central role in the economy to sell management consultancy services that send billions in fees its way. A compelling history informed by numerous insider interviews, this is essential reading for anyone interested in how our economy works and the future of accountancy.

The Reckoning

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

America is suffering from PTSD. The Reckoning diagnoses its core causes and helps begin the healing process.

For four years, Donald J Trump inflicted an onslaught of overlapping and interconnected traumas upon the American people, targeting anyone he perceived as being an ‘other’ or an enemy. Women were discounted and derided, the sick were dismissed as weak and unworthy of help, immigrants and minorities were demonised and discriminated against and money was elevated above all else. In short, he transformed America into a macro version of his malignantly dysfunctional family.

How can Americans make sense of the degree to which their institutions and leaders have let them down? How can they negotiate a world in which all sense of safety and justice seems to have been destroyed? How can they – as individuals and as a nation – confront, process and overcome this loss of trust and the ways they have been forever altered by chaos, division and cruelty? And when the dust finally settles, how can they begin to heal, in the midst of ongoing health and economic crises and the greatest political divide since the Civil War?

Mary L Trump is uniquely positioned to answer these difficult questions. She holds a PhD in clinical psychology specialising in trauma, has herself been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and happens to be Donald J Trump’s only niece. In The Reckoning, she applies her unique expertise to the task of helping Americans confront an all-encompassing trauma, one that has taken an immense toll on their nation’s health and well-being.

A new leader alone cannot fix the situation. Donald J Trump is only the latest symptom of a disease that has existed within the body politic since America’s inception – from the original sin of slavery through its population’s unceasing, organised commitment to inequality. An enormous amount of healing must be done to rebuild the lives of Americans, their faith in leadership and their hope for their nation. It starts with The Reckoning.

The Funny Stuff

‘P. J. O’Rourke was the funniest writer of his generation, one of the smartest and one of the most prolific. Now that he belongs to the ages, P.J. takes his rightful place along with Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain and Dorothy Parker in the Pantheon of Quote Gods.’ Christopher Buckley from his introduction

When The Penguin Dictionary of Modern Humorous Quotations was published in 1994, P. J. O’Rourke had more entries than any living writer. And he kept writing funny stuff for another 28 years. Now, for the first time, the best material is collected in one volume. Edited by his longtime friend Terry McDonell, The Funny Stuff is arranged in six sections, organized by subject in alphabetical order from Agriculture to Xenophobia. Not only did P.J. write memorable one-liners, he also meticulously constructed riffs that built to a crescendo of hilarity and outrage – and are still being quoted years later. His prose has the electric verbal energy of Tom Wolfe or Hunter S. Thompson, but P.J. is more flat-out funny. And through it all comes his clear-eyed take on politics, economics, human nature – and fun. The Funny Stuff is a book for P.J. fans to devour but also a book that will bring new readers and stand as testament to one of the truly original American writers of the last 50 years.

The Quotable P. J. O'Rourke

DON'T VOTE – It Just Encourages the Bastards

Best-selling humorist P.J. O’Rourke is back with his latest political masterpiece, DON’T VOTE – It Just Encourages the Bastards. Using his signature wit and keen observational skills, O’Rourke reflects on his forty year career as a political commentator, spanning his addled hippie youth to his current state of right-wing grouch maturity.

Proclaiming his political stance as to the right of Rush Limbaugh, O’Rourke explores ideas ranging from why Americans love freedom and the founding fathers’ unique perspective on the pursuit of happiness to the modern application of the Bill of Rights, an odd document of which Americans are inordinately proud, that guarantees their rights to Twitter, kvetch, and prevent the Pentagon from sending Marines to sleep on fold-out couches.

Far from the typical high school textbook’s survey of United States history, DON’T VOTE takes a hysterically sharp look at some of the most important issues Americans face today.

Civil Disobedience

In 1846 the philosopher Henry Thoreau was jailed for refusing to pay his taxes. He did so on the grounds that he did not recognise the authority of a government that ‘buys and sells men, women, and children.’ It was this practise of slave ownership in America, as well as his negative feelings towards the popular Mexican-American War, that triggered the writing of his essay, Civil Disobedience, published in 1849. In it he argued that individuals should not allow governments to overrule or destroy their consciences through imposed policy. Thoreau went as far as to say that people have a duty to protect themselves from such acquiescence by rejecting their leaders’ attempts to make them the agents of injustice. In an entrepreneurial and innovative age, he believed that rather than following the directions of others, that every man should try instead to find some way to ‘invent and get a patent for himself’.

DON'T VOTE – It Just Encourages the Bastards

Best-selling humorist P.J. O’Rourke is back with his latest political masterpiece, DON’T VOTE – It Just Encourages the Bastards. Using his signature wit and keen observational skills, O’Rourke reflects on his forty year career as a political commentator, spanning his addled hippie youth to his current state of right-wing grouch maturity.

Proclaiming his political stance as to the right of Rush Limbaugh, O’Rourke explores ideas ranging from why Americans love freedom and the founding fathers’ unique perspective on the pursuit of happiness to the modern application of the Bill of Rights, an odd document of which Americans are inordinately proud, that guarantees their rights to Twitter, kvetch, and prevent the Pentagon from sending Marines to sleep on fold-out couches.

Far from the typical high school textbook’s survey of United States history, DON’T VOTE takes a hysterically sharp look at some of the most important issues Americans face today.