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Untouchable

Jackson was the most talented, richest, and most famous pop star on the planet. But the outpouring of emotion that followed his loss was bittersweet. Dogged by scandal for over fifteen years, and undone by his own tendency to trust the wrong people, Jackson had become untouchable in many quarters, a fact that wounded him deeply. Now, drawing on unprecedented access to friends, enemies, employees, and associates of Jackson, Randall Sullivan delivers an intimate, unflinching, and deeply human portrait of a man who was never quite understood by the media, his fans, or even those closest to him. Untouchable promises to be a profound investigation into the enigma that was Michael Jackson.

Bad Boy Boogie

Bon Scott was once asked if he was AC or DC. ‘Neither,’ he grinned, ‘I’m the lightning flash in the middle.’ And that’s how he lived his life.

No one had the same skill with lyrics as Bon, who called his words ‘toilet poetry’, his ‘dirty ditties’. He could also vividly depict life on the road, best heard in the AC/DC classics ‘Long Way to the Top’ and ‘Highway to Hell’.

When Bon appeared on Countdown in March 1975, the impression he left was indelible. The ugliest schoolgirl to ever grace the small screen, Bon was a mess of tattoos and pigtails, wearing an awkwardly short skirt, all the while puffing on a ciggie. His bandmates, not just the audience, were in hysterics. The video quickly became part of Oz rock folklore.

Bon was always the joker in the AC/DC pack. He’d happily pose for a photograph with a joint dangling from his lips or be interviewed in cut-off shorts with a banana provocatively stuffed into his waistband. Anything to elicit a laugh. The off-stage stories surrounding Bon are legendary. After spending a lively couple of days with Bon, Ol’ 55 singer Jim Manzie said, ‘My rock-and-roll education was pretty much complete.’

Bad Boy Boogie is the first biography to focus on Bon’s remarkable gifts as a lyricist, frontman and rascal. In short, the real Bon Scott.

Anatomy of a Song

Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits transcend commercial value, touching a generation of listeners and altering the direction of music. In Anatomy of a Song, writer and music historian Marc Myers tells the stories behind fifty rock, pop, R&B, country and reggae hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them.

Mick Jagger, Jimmy Page, the Clash, Smokey Robinson, Grace Slick, Roger Waters, Joni Mitchell, Steven Tyler, Rod Stewart, Elvis Costello and many other leading artists reveal the inspirations, struggles and techniques behind their influential works.

Doc

Often compared to David Bowie and Mick Jagger, Doc Neeson was hailed as a ‘messianic rock god’.

He was thumping, pumping, sweaty hard rock. He commanded the stage. He was unstoppable. He was terrifying. He was wild. He was a legend. And as their front man, Doc propelled the Angels to become the highest paid band in Australia in the 1980s and 1990s. With massive album sales in Australia and a US record deal, global superstardom seemed assured . . . but then everything started to fall apart.

This is Doc’s story with the highs, the lows, the girls, the booze, the drugs, the tours, the good deeds, the crazy antics, the dark days and the great split that shattered the Angels. When he died in 2014 from a brain tumour, a black veil came down over a generation of Australian rock fans.

Anatomy of 55 More Songs

Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more – iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also alter the direction of music. In this follow-up to his classic Anatomy of a Song, writer and music historian Marc Myers tells the stories behind fifty-five more rock, pop, R&B, country and reggae hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them.

Part oral history, part musical analysis, Anatomy of 55 More Songs ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Bad Moon Rising’ to Dionne Warwick’s ‘Walk On By’, The Beach Boys’ ‘Good Vibrations’ and Black Sabbath’s ‘Paranoid’. Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John’s ‘Rocket Man’; Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated into ‘Bad Reputation’ and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works.