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Hillary's Antarctica

The first book to fully document and celebrate Sir Edmund Hillary’s contribution to Antarctic history. Written by Nigel Watson of the Antarctic Heritage Trust, it is illustrated with Jane Ussher’s stunning photographs, plus historic images and never-before-seen ephemera and diary entries.

Hillary and the New Zealand team were supposed to be a support act to the British Commonwealth Antarctic crossing party. By heading on to the South Pole and reaching it before the crossing party, Hillary exceeded the brief. His actions created tensions, unleashed a media storm and denied the British an historic first overland to the South Pole since Captain Scott. Hillary even had the audacity to achieve the feat with three farm tractors.

In doing so, Sir Edmund Hillary added another fascinating chapter to the exploration annals of Antarctica and he, and his expedition team, laid the foundations for New Zealand’s continuous, and increasingly important, presence in Antarctica.

Call of the Outback

Long before Robyn Davidson wrote Tracks, the extraordinary Ernestine Hill was renowned for her intrepid travels across Australia’s vast outback.

After the birth of her illegitimate son, Ernestine Hill abandoned her comfortable urban life as a journalist for a nomadic one, writing about the country’s vast interior and bringing the outback into the popular imagination of Australians.

Throughout the 1930s Ernestine’s hugely popular stories about Australia’s remotest regions appeared in newspapers and journals around the nation. She still remains famous for her bestselling books The Great Australian Loneliness, The Territory, Flying Doctor Calling and My Love Must Wait.

Call of the Outback provides a vivid portrait of Ernestine, from the early brilliance she showed as a child in Brisbane to her later life. In particular it evokes her larger-than-life personality, the exotic landscapes she explored and the remarkable characters she met on her travels.