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Wine Reads

Country & Townhouse‘s Best Book for Christmas, 2018

A delectable anthology celebrating the finest writing on wine.

In this richly literary anthology, Jay McInerney – bestselling novelist and acclaimed wine columnist for Town & Country, the Wall Street Journal and House and Garden – selects over twenty pieces of memorable fiction and nonfiction about the making, selling and, of course, drinking of fine wine.

Including excerpts from novels, short fiction, memoir and narrative nonfiction, Wine Reads features big names in the trade and literary heavyweights alike. We follow Kermit Lynch to the Northern Rhône in a chapter from his classic Adventures on the Wine Route. In an excerpt from Between Meals, long-time New Yorker writer A. J. Liebling raises feeding and imbibing on a budget in Paris into something of an art form – and discovers a very good rosé from just west of the Rhone. Michael Dibdin’s fictional Venetian detective Aurelio Zen gets a lesson in Barolo, Barbaresco and Brunello vintages from an eccentric celebrity. Jewish-Czech writer and gourmet Joseph Wechsberg visits the medieval Château d’Yquem to sample different years of the “roi des vins” alongside a French connoisseur who had his first taste of wine at age four.
Also showcasing an iconic scene from Rex Pickett’s Sideways and work by Jancis Robinson, Benjamin Wallace and McInerney himself, this is an essential volume for any disciple of Bacchus.

Scoff

***THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER***

A
Book of the Year in the Daily Mail, Independent, Spectator and The Times & Sunday Times

Finalist for the Guild of Food Writers Food Book Award 2021

‘Sharp, rich and superbly readable… Fascinating’ Sunday Times

‘Utterly delicious’ Observer

‘Superb’ ‘Book of the Week’, The Times

‘Terrific’ ‘Book of the Week’, Guardian

‘I loved it.’ Monty Don

‘A brilliant romp of a book.’ Jay Rayner

Avocado or beans on toast? Gin or claret? Nut roast or game pie? Milk in first or milk in last? And do you have tea, dinner or supper in the evening?

In this fascinating social history of food in Britain, Pen Vogler examines the origins of our eating habits and reveals how they are loaded with centuries of class prejudice. Covering such topics as fish and chips, roast beef, avocados, tripe, fish knives and the surprising origins of breakfast, Scoff reveals how in Britain we have become experts at using eating habits to make judgements about social background.

Bringing together evidence from cookbooks, literature, artworks and social records from 1066 to the present, Vogler traces the changing fortunes of the food we encounter today, and unpicks the aspirations and prejudices of the people who have shaped our cuisine for better or worse.

‘With commendable appetite and immense attention to detail Pen Vogler skewers the enduring relationship between class and food in Britain. A brilliant romp of a book that gets to the very heart of who we think we are, one delicious dish at a time.’ Jay Rayner

Prick With a Fork

Before she was one of Australia’s top restaurant critics, Larissa Dubecki was one of its worst waitresses. A loving homage to her ten-year reign of dining-room terror, Prick With a Fork takes you where a diner should never go. From the crappiest suburban Italian to the hottest place in town, what goes on behind the scenes is rarely less fraught than the seventh circle of hell. Psychopathic chefs, lecherous owners, impossible demands and insufferable customers are just the start of an average shift.

Therapy for former waiters, a revelation to diners and pure reading pleasure for anyone interested in what really happens out the back of the restaurant, Prick With a Fork is an hilarious and horrific dissection of the restaurant industry.

Dining out will never be the same again.

The Raw and the Cooked

A classic collection full of salty wisdom, from ‘the Henry Miller of food writing’ (Wall Street Journal) and author of Legends of the Fall.

Food is an extreme sport for Jim Harrison. As a seven-month old baby he was found chewing the leather binding of the family Bible with ‘its slightly beefy flavour’; from then on, when he didn’t have his nose in a book he could be found eating – everything. The Raw and the Cooked collects his musings on meat, marinades and a million other things besides, from the man who likes to wrestle his dinner to the ground then wash it down with a really good 1967 Latour.