fbpx

Last Night at the Lobster

‘A book that embodies what’s best in us.’ – Stephen King

Washington Post Best Book of the Year,2017
San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year, 2017
Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year,2017

The Red Lobster chain restaurant perched in the far corner of a run-down American mall hasn’t been making its numbers and has pulled the plug. But manager Manny DeLeon still needs to navigate a tricky last shift with a near-mutinous staff and the final onslaught of hungry retirees, lunatics, and office parties.

All the while, Manny wondering how to handle the waitress he’s still in love with, what to do about his pregnant girlfriend, and how to find the Christmas present that will make everything better.

Stewart O’Nan has been called ‘the bard of the working class’, and Last Night at the Lobster is a American cult classic and a masterpiece of precision and empathy.

Love in Row 27

What happens when Cupid plays co-pilot?

Still reeling from a break-up, Cora Hendricks has given up on ever finding love. For herself, that is. To pass the time while working the Aer Lingus check-in desk at Heathrow, Cora begins to play cupid with high-flying singles.

Using only her intuition, the internet, and glamorous flight attendant accomplice Nancy, Row 27 becomes Cora’s laboratory of love. Instead of being seated randomly, two unwitting passengers on each flight find themselves next to the person of their dreams – or not.

Cora swears Row 27 is just a bit of fun, but while she’s busy making sparks fly at cruising altitude, the love she’d given up on for herself just might have landed right in front of her…

Leaving Las Vegas

A re-issue of John O’Brien’s debut novel, a masterpiece of modern realism about the perils of addiction and love in a city of loneliness.

Leaving Las Vegas, the first novel by John O’Brien, is the disturbing and emotionally wrenching story of a woman who embraces life and a man who rejects it.

Sera is a prostitute, content with the independence and routine she has carved out for herself in a city defined by recklessness. But she is haunted by a spectre in a yellow Mercedes, a man from her past who is committed to taking control of her life again.

Ben is an alcoholic intent on drinking his way towards an early death. Newly arrived from Los Angeles, he survived the four-hour intoxicated drive across the desert with his entire savings in his wallet and nothing else left to lose.

Looking to satisfy hungers both material and existential, Ben and Sera stumble together on the strip and discover in each other a respite from their unforgiving lives.

A testimony to the raw talent of its young author, Leaving Las Vegas is a compelling story of unconditional love between two disenfranchised and lost souls – an overlooked American classic.

House of Stone

Winner of the Edward Stanford Prize for Fiction with a Sense of Place, 2019
Shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, 2019
Shortlisted for the Orwell Prize, 2019
Longlisted for the Rathbones Folio Prize, 2019
__________

‘Easily the best debut I’ve read this year, Tshuma’s novel is both hilarious and horrifying, filled with compassion, anger and despair. [Her] unreliable narrator [is] of the kind that deserves to be remembered up there with Humbert Humbert’ Kim Evans, Culturefly
__________

Bukhosi has gone missing.

His father, Abed, and his mother, Agnes, cling to the hope that he has run away, rather than been murdered by government thugs. Only the lodger seems to have any idea…

Zamani has lived in the spare room for years now. Quiet, polite, well-read and well-heeled, he’s almost part of the family but almost isn’t quite good enough for Zamani. Cajoling, coaxing and coercing Abed and Agnes into revealing their sometimes tender, often brutal life stories, Zamani aims to steep himself in borrowed family history, so that he can fully inherit and inhabit its uncertain future.

The Knowledge

In the new mystery in the bestselling Richard Jury series, Martha Grimes brings London’s finest on a double-homicide case that involves Kenyan art, rare gems, astrophysics and a long-fermented act of revenge.

‘Read any one [of her novels] and you’ll want to read them all.’Chicago Tribune

Robbie Parsons is one of London’s finest, a black cab driver who knows every street, every theatre, every landmark in the city by heart. In his backseat is a man with a gun in his hand – a man who shot Robbie’s previous pair of customers point-blank in front of the Artemis Club, a rarefied art gallery-cum-casino, then jumped in and ordered Parsons to drive.

As the killer eventually escapes to Nairobi with ten-year-old Patty Haigh – one of a crew of stray kids who serve as the cabbies’ eyes and ears at Heathrow and Waterloo – in pursuit, superintendent Richard Jury comes across the double-homicide in the Saturday paper.

Two days previously, Jury had met and instantly connected with one of the victims, a professor of astrophysics at Columbia and an expert gambler. Jury considers the murder a personal affront and is soon contending with a case that takes unexpected turns into Tanzanian gem mines, a closed casino in Reno, and a pub that only London’s black cabbies, those who have ‘the knowledge,’ can find.

Kill [redacted]

‘Provocative and compelling, it is a spectacular debut’Daily Mail

Michael lost his wife in a terrorist attack on a London train. Since then, he has been seeing a therapist to help him come to terms with his grief – and his anger. He can’t get over the fact that the man he holds responsible has seemingly got away scot-free. He doesn’t blame the bombers, who he considers only as the logical conclusion to a long chain of events. No, to Michael’s mind, the ultimate cause is the politician whose cynical policies have had such deadly impact abroad. His therapist suggests that he write his feelings down to help him forgive and move on, but as a retired headteacher, Michael believes that for every crime there should be a fitting punishment – and so in the pages of his diary he begins to set out the case for, and set about committing, murder.

Waltzing through the darkling journal of a brilliant mind put to serious misuse, Kill [redacted] is a powerful and provocative exploration of the contours of grief and the limits of moral justice, and a blazing condemnation of all those who hold, and abuse, power.

ONE OF THE BEST DEBUT NOVELS of 2019 (the i )

The Old Success

ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES‘ BEST CRIME NOVELS OF THE YEAR

When the body of a Frenchwoman washes up on a wild inlet off the Cornish coast, Brian Macalvie, divisional commander with the Devon-Cornwall police, is called in. With the only visible footprints belonging to the two girls who found her, who could have killed this mysterious tourist?

While Macalvie stands stumped in the Isles of Scilly, Inspector Richard Jury – twenty miles away on Land’s End – is at the Old Success pub, sharing a drink with the legendary former CID detective Tom Brownell, a man renowned for solving every case he undertook. Except one.

In the weeks following the unexplained death of the tourist, two other murders are called in to Macalvie and Jury’s teams: first, a man is found dead on a Northamptonshire estate, then a cleaner turns up murdered at Exeter Cathedral. When Macalvie and Jury decide to consult Brownell, the retired detective insists that the three murders, though very different in execution, are connected. As the trio set out to solve this puzzle, Jury and Macalvie hope that this doesn’t turn out to be Brownell’s second ever miss.

Written with Grimes’s signature wit, sly plotting, and gloriously offbeat characters, The Old Success is prime fare from ‘one of the most fascinating mystery writers today’ (Houston Chronicle).

Milk Blood Heat

‘A seething excavation of want and human error’ Raven Leilani, author of Luster

‘Glorious, ecstatic, devastating… A gorgeous debut from a wickedly talented new author’
Lauren Groff, author of Florida

‘Sultry, dark, thick with the heat of bodies and minds in sin and transgression. Incredible’
Jamel Brinkley, author of A Lucky Man

A thirteen-year-old girl watches her white best friend totter along the edge of a building roof; a woman who lost her child in its first trimester finds empathy and horror in the waters of a city aquarium; a mother protects her teen daughter from a predatory love interest by taking revenge over a very French supper; and two estranged siblings take a road-trip with their dead father’s ashes – rediscovering one another and reckoning with all the ways that trust can be betrayed and love can be redeemed.

Set in the suburbs and the cities of the modern world but about the ancient essences of who and what we are, Milk Blood Heat is a collection of love and sex, birth and death. Through the stories of ordinary characters confronted by extraordinary moments of violent yet often beautiful reckoning, Dantiel W. Moniz contemplates human connection, race, womanhood, inheritance, and the elemental darkness in us all. Wise and subversive, spiritual and seductive, Milk Blood Heat showcases that the world in which we live can be a place of obstacles and heartbreak… but also one of grace and splendour.

A Roxane Gay Bookclub Pick

America City

Arthur C. Clarke Award-Winning Author

‘An uneasy read that manages to feel both timely and urgent… Beckett offers an intelligent, visceral reminder that unless we change what today looks like, tomorrow will be turbulent indeed.’ – Guardian

America, one century on: a warmer climate is causing vast movements of people. Droughts, floods and hurricanes force entire populations to abandon their homes. Tensions are mounting between north and south, and some northern states are threatening to close their borders against homeless fellow-Americans from the south.

Against this backdrop, an ambitious young British-born publicist, Holly Peacock, meets a new client, the charismatic Senator Slaymaker, a politician whose sole mission is to keep America together, reconfiguring the entire country in order to meet the challenge of the new climate realities as a single, united nation. When he runs for President, Holly becomes his right hand woman, doing battle on the whisperstream, where stories are everything and truth counts for little.

But can they bring America together – or have they set the country on a new, but equally devastating, path?

The Veins of the Ocean

By the author of Infinite Country, a Reese’s Book Club pick 2021

WINNER OF THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE 2017

Reina Castillo’s beloved brother is serving a death sentence for a crime that shocked the community – a crime for which Reina secretly blames herself. When she is at last released from her seven-year prison vigil, Reina moves to a sleepy town in the Florida Keys seeking anonymity.

There, she meets Nesto, a recently exiled Cuban awaiting with hope the arrival of the children he left behind in Havana. Through Nesto’s love of the sea and capacity for faith, Reina comes to understand her own connections to the life-giving and destructive forces of the ocean that surrounds her as well as its role in her family’s troubled history.

Set in the vibrant coastal and Caribbean communities of Miami; the Florida Keys; Havana, Cuba; and Cartagena, Colombia, The Veins of the Ocean is a wrenching exploration of what happens when life tests the limits of compassion, and a stunning and unforgettable portrait of fractured lives finding solace in the beauty and power of the natural world, and in one another.