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Genesis Machines

Silicon chips are out. Today’s scientists are using real, wet, squishy, living biology to build the next generation of computers. Cells, gels and DNA strands are the ‘wetware’ of the twenty-first century. Much smaller and more intelligent, these organic computers open up revolutionary possibilities.

Tracing the history of computing and revealing a brave new world to come, Genesis Machines describes how this new technology will change the way we think not just about computers – but about life itself.

How is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?

The Internet, in the memorable words of EDGE founder John Brockman, is ‘the infinite oscillation of our collective consciousness interacting with itself. It’s not about computers. It’s not about what it means to be human – in fact, it challenges, renders trite, our cherished assumptions on that score. It is about thinking’.

In How is the Internet Changing the Way you Think?, the latest volume in Brockman’s cutting-edge Edge questions series, 154 of the world’s leading intellectuals – scientists, artists and creative thinkers – explore exactly what it means to think in the new age of the Internet: from Nicholas Carr’s reflections on what the Internet is doing to our brains, to Richard Dawkins’s sanguine assessment of its long-term potential for good; and from Clay Shirky’s assessment of the impact of the Internet on the dissemination and sharing of knowledge, to Ian and Joel Gold’s observations on the seismic social changes it has brought about.

Editor John Brockman has assembled a world-class array of contributors, which includes (in addition to those mentioned above) Daniel C. Dennett, Martin Rees, Steven Pinker, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Sean Carroll, Brian Eno, Douglas Coupland, Matt Ridley, and scores of others at the epicentre of research in their respective disciplines.

Console Wars

In 1990 Nintendo had a virtual monopoly on the video game industry. Sega, on the other hand, was a faltering arcade company with big aspirations and even bigger personalities. But that would all change with the arrival of Tom Kalinske, a man who knew nothing about video games and everything about fighting uphill battles. His unconventional tactics, combined with the blood, sweat and bold ideas of his renegade employees, transformed Sega and eventually led to a ruthless David-and-Goliath showdown with rival Nintendo.

The battle was vicious, relentless and highly profitable, eventually sparking a global corporate war that would be fought on several fronts: from living rooms and schoolyards to boardrooms and Congress. It was a once-in-a-lifetime, no-holds-barred conflict that pitted brother against brother, kid against adult, Sonic against Mario, and the US against Japan.

Console Wars is the underdog tale of how Kalinske miraculously turned an industry punchline into a market leader. It’s the story of how a humble family man, with an extraordinary imagination and a gift for turning problems into competitive advantages, inspired a team of underdogs to slay a giant and, as a result, birth a $60 billion dollar industry.