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Running With Scissors

The #1 New York Times Bestseller

An Entertainment Weekly Top Ten Book of the Year


Now a Major Motion Picture

This is the true story of a boy who wanted to grow up with the Brady Bunch, but ended up living with the Addams Family. Augusten Burroughs’s mother gave him away to be raised by her psychiatrist, a dead ringer for Santa Claus and a certifiable lunatic into the bargain. The doctor’s bizarre family, a few patients and a sinister man living in the garden shed completed the tableau. The perfect squalor of their dilapidated Victorian house, there were no rules and there was no school. The Christmas tree stayed up until summer and Valium was chomped down like sweets. And when things got a bit slow, there was always the ancient electroshock therapy machine under the stairs…

‘This is the Brady Bunch on Viagra… it is impossible not to laugh at all the jokes; to admire the sardonic, fetid tone; to wonder, slack-jawed and agog, at the sheer looniness of the vista he conjures up’ — Rachel Cooke, Observer

Fortune's Daughters

The story of the three Jerome sisters is one of love, glamour and money in equal measure. Their father, Leonard, was a profligate New York stockbroker whose beautiful wife, Clara Hall, was as extravagant as her husband. Their three daughters – Jennie, Clara and Leonie – were provided with every advantage, and lived a charmed existence. A fortuitous encounter in London with the Prince of Wales, who later became Edward VII, launched the girls into English society. Acclaimed wherever they went, they became known, simply, as ‘the Good, the Witty and the Beautiful.’

Jennie Jerome (‘the beautiful’) married Randolph Churchill, younger son of the Duke of Marlborough and was Winston’s mother. Clara Jerome (‘the good’) was romanced by the dashing Moreton Frewin, who had already squandered what capital he had on gambling, sports and women, while Leonie Jerome (‘the witty’) married into the Leslies, a distinguished Irish family, who were disappointed by their son’s choice of bride.

Elisabeth Kehoe’s wonderful book covers more than one hundred years of family history and spans nineteenth-century New York, the fall of the second republic in France and Britain during both world wars. She draws on original research to follow the progress of the Jerome sisters, who remained close to each other throughout their lives. Their stories describe the poignant and ultimately, unsuccessful quest for true love and happiness.

The Aquariums of Pyongyang

‘I beseech you to read this account’ Christopher Hitchens

A magnificent, harrowing testimony to the voiceless victims of North Korea.

Kang Chol-Hwan is the first survivor of a North Korean concentration camp to escape the ‘hermit kingdom’ and tell his story to the world. This memoir reveals the human suffering in his camp, with its forced labour, frequent public executions and near-starvation rations. Kang eventually escaped to South Korea via China to give testimony to the hardships and atrocities that constitute the lives of the thousands of people still detained in the gulags today. Part horror story, part historical document, part memoir, part political tract, this story of one young man’s personal suffering finally gives eye-witness proof to this neglected chapter of modern history.

Magical Thinking

A collection of autobiographical short stories, small vignettes of his life experiences, universal in their appeal yet unabashedly intimate and very funny.

From the #1 bestselling author of Running with Scissors and Dry comes a contagiously funny, heartwarming, shocking, twisted, and absolutely magical collection.

True stories that give voice to the thoughts we all have but dare not mention. It begins with a Tang Instant Breakfast Drink television commercial when Augusten was seven. Then there is the contest of wills with the deranged cleaning lady. The execution of a rodent carried out with military precision and utter horror. Telemarketing revenge. Dating an undertaker and much more. A collection of true stories that are universal in their appeal yet unabashedly intimate and very funny.

American Prometheus

***SOON TO BE A MAJOR HOLLYWOOD FILM DIRECTED BY CHRISTOPHER NOLAN***

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR NONFICTION

‘Reads like a thriller, gripping and terrifying’ Sunday Times

Physicist and polymath, as familiar with Hindu scriptures as he was with quantum mechanics, J. Robert Oppenheimer – director of the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb – was the most famous scientist of his generation. In their meticulous and riveting biography, Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin reveal a brilliant, ambitious, complex and flawed man, profoundly involved with some of the momentous events of the twentieth century.

Where Men Win Glory

Pat Tillman was well-known to American sports fans: a chisel-jawed and talented young professional football star, he was on the brink of signing a million dollar contract when, in 2001, al-Qaeda launched terrorist attacks against his country. Driven by deeply felt moral patriotism, he walked away from fame and money to enlist in the United States Special Operations Forces. A year later he was killed – apparently in the line of fire – on a desolate hillside near the Pakistan border in Afghanistan.

News of Tillman’s death shocked America. But even as the public mourned his loss, the US Army aggressively maneuvered to conceal the truth: that it was a ranger in Tillman’s own platoon who had fired the fatal shots.

In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer reveals how an entire country was deliberately deceived by those at the very highest levels of the US army and government. Infused with the power and authenticity readers have come to expect from Krakauer’s storytelling, Where Men Win Glory exposes shattering truths about men and war.

Blood Knots

As a child in the 1960s, Luke Jennings was fascinated by the rivers and lakes around his Sussex home. Beneath their surfaces, it seemed to him, waited alien and mysterious worlds. With library books as his guide, he applied himself to the task of learning to fish.

His progress was slow, and for years he caught nothing. But then a series of teachers presented themselves, including an inspirational young intelligence officer, from whom he learnt stealth, deception and the art of the dry fly. So began an enlightening but often dark-shadowed journey of discovery. It would lead to bright streams and wild country, but would end with his mentor’s capture, torture and execution by the IRA.

Blood Knots is about angling, about great fish caught and lost, but it is also about friendship, honour and coming of age. As an adult Jennings has sought out lost and secretive waterways, probing waters ‘as deep as England’ at dead of night in search of giant pike. The quest, as always, is for more than the living quarry. For only by searching far beneath the surface, Jennings suggests in this most moving and thought-provoking of memoirs, can you connect with your own deep history.

Killing Pablo

Killing Pablo charts the rise and spectacular fall of the Colombian drug lord, Pablo Escobar, the richest and most powerful criminal in history. The book exposes the massive illegal operation by covert US Special Forces and intelligence services to hunt down and assassinate Escobar.

Killing Pablo combines the heart-stopping energy of a Tom Clancy techno-thriller and the stunning detail of award-winning investigative journalism. It is the most dramatic and detailed and account ever published of America’s dirtiest clandestine war.

The Impossible Life of Mary Benson

Young Minnie Sidgwick was just twelve years old when her cousin, twenty-three-year old Edward Benson, proposed to her in 1853. Edward went on to become Archbishop of Canterbury and little Minnie – as Mary Benson – to preside a social world that ranged from Tennyson, Henry James and Oscar Wilde to foreign royalty and Queen Victoria herself.

Yet Mrs Benson’s most intense relationships were not with her husband and his associates, but with other women. When the Archbishop died, Mary – ‘Ben’ to her intimates – turned down an offer from the Queen to live at Windsor, and set up home in a Jacobean manor house with her friend Lucy Tait. As Good as God, as Clever as the Devil, is the sometimes touching, sometimes hilarious, story of one lovable, brilliant woman and her trajectory through the often surprising opportunities and the remarkable limitations of a Victorian woman’s life.

What It Is Like To Go To War

In 1968, at the age of 22, Karl Marlantes abandoned his Oxford University scholarship to sign up for active service with the US Marine Corps in Vietnam. Pitched into a war that had no defined military objective other than kill ratios and body counts, what he experienced over the next thirteen months in the jungles of South East Asia shook him to the core. But what happened when he came home covered with medals was almost worse. It took Karl four decades to come to terms with what had really happened, during the course of which he painstakingly constructed a fictionalized version of his war, MATTERHORN, which has subsequently been hailed as the definitive Vietnam novel.

WHAT IT IS LIKE TO GO TO WAR takes us back to Vietnam, but this time there is no fictional veil. Here are the hard-won truths that underpin MATTERHORN: the author’s real-life experiences behind the book’s indelible scenes. But it is much more than this. It is part exorcism of Karl’s own experiences of combat, part confession, part philosophical primer for the young man about to enter combat. It It is also a devastatingly frank answer to the questions ‘What is it like to be a soldier?What is it like to face death?‘ and ‘What is it like to kill someone?