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The Invention of Russia

WINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE 2016
WINNER OF THE CORNELIUS RYAN AWARD
FINALIST FOR THE LIONEL GELBER PRIZE
FINANCIAL TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR

How did a country that liberated itself from seventy years of Soviet rule end up as one of the biggest threats to the West and, above all, to its own future? Why did the people who rejected Communist ideology come to accept state propaganda? In this bold and important book, Arkady Ostrovsky takes the reader on an enthralling journey through Russia’s tumultuous post-Soviet transformation and illuminates the key turning points that often took the world by surprise.

As a foreign correspondent in his own country, Ostrovsky has experienced Russia’s modern history first-hand, and through original research and interviews he reveals the ideological conflicts, compromises and temptations that have left Russia on a knife-edge.

Letters of Intent

‘What we ought to do, as writers, is seize freedom now, immediately, by recognizing that we already have it.’

Cynthia Ozick, one of ‘the greatest living American writers’, has, over a lifetime of observation, produced some of the sharpest and most influential works of criticism in contemporary Anglo-American writing. Described as the ‘Emily Dickinson of the Bronx’ and ‘one of the most accomplished and graceful literary stylists of her time’, her acclaimed works span topics from Henry James to Helen Keller, and from Christian Heroism to lovesickness.

The essays selected here come from the six volumes Ozick published in the USA over the last thirty-three years. Collected by David Miller, Ozick’s friend and agent, they represent the diversity, curiosity, originality, and crackling wit of her works. A volume to treasure, to re-read and to relish, this is Cynthia Ozick, ‘the Athena of America’s literary pantheon’, at her very best.

Critics, Monsters, Fanatics and Other Literary Essays

If every outlet for book criticism suddenly disappeared – if all we had were reviews that treated books like any other commodity – could the novel survive? In a gauntlet-throwing essay at the start of this brilliant assemblage, Cynthia Ozick stakes the claim that, just as surely as critics require a steady supply of new fiction, novelists need great critics to build a vibrant community on the foundation of literary history. For decades, Ozick herself has been one of our great critics, as these essays so clearly display. She offers models of critical analysis of writers from the mid-twentieth century to today, from Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, and Kafka, to William Gass and Martin Amis, all assembled in provocatively named groups: Fanatics, Monsters, Figures, and others. Uncompromising and brimming with insight, these essays are essential reading for anyone facing the future of literature in the digital age.

The Din in the Head

One of America’s foremost novelists and critics, Cynthia Ozick has won praise and provoked debate for taking on challenging literary, historical, and moral issues. In her spirited essay collection The Din in the Head, she focuses on the essential joys of great literature. With razor-sharp wit and an inspiring joie de vivre, Ozick investigates unexpected byways in the works of Leo Tolstoy, Saul Bellow, Helen Keller, Isaac Babel, Sylvia Plath, Susan Sontag, and Henry James, among others. Throughout this bracing collection, she celebrates the curative power of the literary imagination.

Art and Ardor

Art & Ardor was the first of Cynthia Ozick’s collections of her non-fiction pieces, and covers the longest span (1968 to 1983) of the now seven volumes. First printed in a variety of publications, these pieces appeared in not only The New Republic, Partisan Review, and The New York Review of Books, but also Mademoiselle and Ms.

Metaphor and Memory

From the author of The Messiah of Stockholm and Art and Ardor comes this collection of supple, provocative, and intellectually dazzling essays. In Metaphor & Memory, Cynthia Ozick writes about Saul Bellow and Henry James, William Gaddis and Primo Levi. She observes the tug-of-war between written and spoken language and the complex relation between art’s contrivances and its moral truths. She has given us an exceptional book that demonstrates the possibilities of literature even as it explores them.

Fame and Folly

From one of America’s great literary figures, a collection of essays on eminent writers and their work, and on the war between art and life. The perilous intersection of writers’ lives with public and private dooms is the fertile subject of many of these remarkable essays from such literary giants as T.S. Eliot, Isaac Babel, Salman Rushdie and Henry James.